My apologies. You know what to do. Also the eaudio is purchased as well.

Love warrior : a memoirThe highly anticipated new memoir by bestselling author Glennon Doyle Melton tells the story of her journey of self-discovery after the implosion of her marriage. Just when Glennon Doyle Melton was beginning to feel she had it all figured out–three happy children, a doting spouse, and a writing career so successful that her first book catapulted to the top of the New York Times bestseller list–her husband revealed his infidelity and she was forced to realize that nothing was as it seemed. A recovering alcoholic and bulimic, Glennon found that rock bottom was a familiar place. In the midst of crisis, she knew to hold on to what she discovered in recovery: that her deepest pain has always held within it an invitation to a richer life.

 

A new Pew study reveals that Americans’ reading habits are being maintained. What’s more, the percentages reading an ebook vs. a print book have been level as well for the past four years.  While single method only readers favor print over ebooks by 38% to 6%, what’s really interesting is that a solid 28% read in both formats.  A full 26% in this survey have not read a *single book in the past year* and admit it (I figure reading books is an admired activity that one might inflate in self-reporting).  Still, even if the read-a-book figure is high, it’s consistently so, indicating no decline in overall reading.  What I like also about a survey like this is that it’s asking people how many books they read – whether self-published or traditionally published, whether bought at big box retail or borrowed from a library, etc. – not trying to track sales, so there is none of the usual suspicion that a certain market is being missed entirely.

Another note of utter stability is the age breakdown, indicating no necessary change in these preferences in the near future.  The factors in preferring digital seem to be income and education.  From the study:

Relatively few Americans are “digital-only” book readers regardless of their demographic characteristics. However, some demographic groups are slightly more likely than others to do all of their reading in digital format. For instance, 7% of college graduates are digital-only book readers (compared with just 3% of those who have not graduated from high school), as are 8% of those with annual household incomes of $75,000 or more (compared with 3% of Americans with incomes of $30,000 or less). Interestingly, young adults are no more likely than older adults to be “digital-only” book readers: 6% of 18- to 29-year-olds read books in digital formats only, compared with 7% of 30- to 49-year-olds and 5% of those 50 and older.

 

EarlyWord has an excellent article summarizing the intense speculation surrounding Oprah’s new secret book pick slated for publication September 6th.  The title is coyly listed as “Oprah Book Club September 2016” with a BISAC subject of general fiction in our vendor databases.

The Wall Street Journal, using logic quite convincing to me, has nevertheless zoned in on a memoir of the same page count to be published the same day. Running with that, yesterday we ordered an additional 20 copies on the non-fiction budget on the mysterious “edition,” but even if Oprah’s actual choice turns out to be a delightful head fake, we will be able to merge its record with the standard one for whatever book this is, which doubtless we already have on order as well.  And of course more orders will ensue if necessary.

So…even though the biography here below may not be the “one” it’s worth mentioning anyway, as it’s running an almost repurchase triggering holds queue on its own.  The author spoke at a BEA dinner and is infectiously inspiring and likeable. Sorry, I don’t think I can find a leftover print ARC of it.  Somebody at Baker & Taylor must be on board with the prevailing conjecture, since if you search “Glennon Doyle Melton” in TitleSource, the Oprah September listings are totally retrieved.

And to think for a while I thought I might never use the Oprah Book Club post category again!

Update: Yep http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/2016/09/06/oprahs-latest-book-club-pick-love-warrior/89907746/ 

Melton, Glennon Doyle.  Love Warrior.  Flatiron, September 6th.

Love Warrior : A MemoirPublisher Summary: The highly anticipated new memoir by bestselling author Glennon Doyle Melton tells the story of her journey of self-discovery after the implosion of her marriage. Just when Glennon Doyle Melton was beginning to feel she had it all figured out–three happy children, a doting spouse, and a writing career so successful that her first book catapulted to the top of the New York Times bestseller list–her husband revealed his infidelity and she was forced to realize that nothing was as it seemed. A recovering alcoholic and bulimic, Glennon found that rock bottom was a familiar place. In the midst of crisis, she knew to hold on to what she discovered in recovery: that her deepest pain has always held within it an invitation to a richer life. Love Warrior is the story of one marriage, but it is also the story of the healing that is possible for any of us when we refuse to settle for good enough and begin to face pain and love head-on. This astonishing memoir reveals how our ideals of masculinity and femininity can make it impossible for a man and a woman to truly know one another – and it captures the beauty that unfolds when one couple commits to unlearning everything they’ve been taught so that they can finally, after thirteen years of marriage, fall in love. Love Warrior is a gorgeous and inspiring account of how we are born to be warriors: strong, powerful, and brave; able to confront the pain and claim the love that exists for us all. This chronicle of a beautiful, brutal journey speaks to anyone who yearns for deeper, truer relationships and a more abundant, authentic life.

 

Claim to comment.  We also have another of Jodi Picoult’s Small Great Things.

Parkhurst, Carolyn.  Harmony. Pamela Dorman, August 2016.

Harmony : a novel

How far will a mother go to save her family? The Hammond family is living in DC, where everything seems to be going just fine, until it becomes clear that the oldest daughter, Tilly, is developing abnormally–a mix of off-the-charts genius and social incompetence. Once Tilly–whose condition is deemed undiagnosable–is kicked out of the last school in the area, her mother Alexandra is out of ideas. The family turns to Camp Harmony and the wisdom of child behavior guru Scott Bean for a solution. But what they discover in the woods of New Hampshire will push them to the very limit. Told from the alternating perspectives of both Alexandra and her younger daughter Iris (the book’s Nick Carraway), this is a unputdownable story about the strength of love, the bonds of family, and how you survive the unthinkable.

 

 

 

This is a second offering of each of these.  I gave out an ARC of the Nix in June and have another.  It’s coming out next Tuesday.  It’s an impressive, amazing debut but may need a bit of word of mouth.

Hill, Nathan. The Nix. Knopf, August 2016.

Summary: “The Nix is a mother-son psychodrama with ghosts and politics, but it’s also a tragicomedy about anger and sanctimony in America. . . . Nathan Hill is a maestro.” –John Irving A Nix can take many formThe nix : a novels. In Norwegian folklore, it is a spirit who sometimes appears as a white horse that steals children away. In Nathan Hill’s remarkable first novel, a Nix is anything you love that one day disappears, taking with it a piece of your heart.  It’s 2011, and Samuel Andresen-Anderson–college professor, stalled writer–has a Nix of his own: his mother, Faye. He hasn’t seen her in decades, not since she abandoned the family when he was a boy. Now she’s re-appeared, having committed an absurd crime that electrifies the nightly news, beguiles the internet, and inflames a politically divided country. The media paints Faye as a radical hippie with a sordid past, but as far as Samuel knows, his mother was an ordinary girl who married her high-school sweetheart. Which version of his mother is true? Two facts are certain: she’s facing some serious charges, and she needs Samuel’s help.  To save her, Samuel will have to embark on his own journey, uncovering long-buried secrets about the woman he thought he knew, secrets that stretch across generations and have their origin all the way back in Norway, home of the mysterious Nix. As he does so, Samuel will confront not only Faye’s losses but also his own lost love, and will relearn everything he thought he knew about his mother, and himself.  From the suburban Midwest to New York City to the 1968 riots that rocked Chicago and beyond, The Nix explores–with sharp humor and a fierce tenderness–the resilience of love and home, even in times of radical change.

 

 

 

This has 27 holds and building – a fiction winner from Norton.

The Book That Matters Most

Summary: Ava’s twenty-five-year marriage has fallen apart, and her two grown children are pursuing their own lives outside of the country. Ava joins a book group, not only for her love of reading but also out of sheer desperation for companionship. The group’s goal throughout the year is for each member to present the book that matters most to them. Ava rediscovers a mysterious book from her childhood–one that helped her through the traumas of the untimely deaths of her sister and mother. Alternating with Ava’s story is that of her troubled daughter Maggie, who, living in Paris, descends into a destructive relationship with an older man. Ava’s mission to find that book and its enigmatic author takes her on a quest that unravels the secrets of her past and offers her and Maggie the chance to remake their lives.

This is about to trigger the Holds Purchase Alert and Moore’s The Sherlockian (2010) circulated over 300 times.  Be the first to claim an advance copy, no litigation involved.

The last days of night : a novel

SOON TO BE A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE STARRING EDDIE REDMAYNE New York, 1888. Gas lamps still flicker in the city streets, but the miracle of electric light is in its infancy. The person who controls the means to turn night into day will make history–and a vast fortune. A young untested lawyernamed Paul Cravath, fresh out of Columbia Law School, takes a case that seems impossible to win. Paul’s client, George Westinghouse, has been sued by Thomas Edison over a billion-dollar question: Who invented the light bulb and holds the right to power the country? The case affords Paul entry to the heady world of high society–the glittering parties in Gramercy Park mansions, and the more insidious dealings done behind closed doors. The task facing him is beyond daunting. Edison is a wily, dangerous opponent with vast resources at his disposal–private spies, newspapers in his pocket, and the backing of J. P. Morgan himself. Yet this unknown lawyer shares with his famous adversary a compulsion to win at all costs. How will he do it? In obsessive pursuit of victory, Paul crosses paths with Nikola Tesla, an eccentric, brilliant inventor who may hold the key to defeating Edison, and with Agnes Huntington, a beautiful opera singer who proves to be a flawless performer on stage and off. As Paul takes greater and greater risks, he’ll find that everyone in his path is playing their own game, and no one is quite who they seem.