This is been getting quite some buzz and is now on order (Thanks ACQ! There will be 11 copies, not one – this was zapped by the server unpleasantness). Comment to claim this ARC.

Finn, A.J. The Woman in the Window. WilliamMorrow, January 2018.

The Woman in the Window

 

Publisher Summary from HarperCollins: SFor readers of Gillian Flynn and Tana French comes one of the decade’s most anticipated debuts, to be published in thirty-six languages around the world and already in development as a major film from Fox: a twisty, powerful Hitchcockian thriller about an agoraphobic woman who believes she witnessed a crime in a neighboring house.

It isn’t paranoia if it’s really happening . . .

Anna Fox lives alone—a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times . . . and spying on her neighbors.

Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, a mother, their teenage son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn’t, her world begins to crumble—and its shocking secrets are laid bare.

What is real? What is imagined? Who is in danger? Who is in control? In this diabolically gripping thriller, no one—and nothing—is what it seems.

Twisty and powerful, ingenious and moving, The Woman in the Window is a smart, sophisticated novel of psychological suspense that recalls the best of Hitchcock.

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Courtesy of Becky and her LJ connection.  These aren’t quite in the catalog yet but will be shortly.  Educated  I can attest is an engaging memoir, written with critical affection and a literary flourish. The author is a History PHD whose paranoid and apocalypse obsessed parents, a scrap dealer and unlicensed midwife in rural Idaho, prevented her from receiving any formal education and who went on nonetheless to attend Brigham Young, Cambridge and Harvard.  Some are comparing it to The Glass Castle.   Comment to claim and please specify which title you’re interested in.  As this is a staff-only blog, I will concentrate on distributing some of our ARC’s on it since they should not be distributed directly to the public.

Westover, Tara. Educated: A Memoir. Random House, February 20, 2018.

Educated by Tara WestoverPublisher Summary: Tara Westover was seventeen the first time she set foot in a classroom. Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, she prepared for the end of the world by stockpiling home-canned peaches and sleeping with her “head-for-the-hills” bag. In the summer she stewed herbs for her mother, a midwife and healer, and in the winter she salvaged metal in her father’s junkyard.

Her father distrusted the medical establishment, so Tara never saw a doctor or nurse. Gashes and concussions, even burns from explosions, were all treated at home with herbalism. The family was so isolated from mainstream society that there was no one to ensure the children received an education, and no one to intervene when an older brother became violent.

When another brother got himself into college and came back with news of the world beyond the mountain, Tara decided to try a new kind of life. She taught herself enough mathematics, grammar, and science to take the ACT and was admitted to Brigham Young University. There, she studied psychology, politics, philosophy, and history, learning for the first time about pivotal world events like the Holocaust and the Civil Rights Movement. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge University. Only then would she wonder if she’d traveled too far, if there was still a way home.

Educated is an account of the struggle for self-invention. It is a tale of fierce family loyalty, and of the grief that comes from severing ties with those closest to you. With the acute insight that distinguishes all great writers, Westover has crafted a universal coming-of-age story that gets to the heart of what an education is and what it offers: the perspective to see one’s life through new eyes, and the will to change it.

Elliott, Lexie.  The French Girl. Berkley, February 20, 2018.

The French Girl by Lexie Elliott

This already has 74 holds on 35 copies for a February publication date.  Comment to claim.

The Great Alone

Publisher Description from MacMillan Palgrave: 

Alaska, 1974.
Untamed.
Unpredictable.
And for a family in crisis, the ultimate test of the human spirit.

From the author who brought you the phenomenon of The Nightingale.

This is also from Nancy’s have-read stash, but she wants you to make your own judgment.  This should also be in the catalog very soon.  Benjamin’s The Swans of Fifth Avenue, about Truman Capote’s falling out with his connected friends and beginning a personal spiral and artistic block, circulated 564 times – and The Aviator’s Wife, about the Lindberghs, almost 600.  Comment to claim.

Benjamin, Melanie. The Girls in the Picture. Delacorte, January 16th, 2018.

The Girls in the PicturePublisher Summary: It is 1914, and twenty-five-year-old Frances Marion has left her (second) husband and her Northern California home for the lure of Los Angeles, where she is determined to live independently as an artist. But the word on everyone’s lips these days is “flickers”—the silent moving pictures enthralling theatergoers. Turn any corner in this burgeoning town and you’ll find made-up actors running around, as a movie camera captures it all.

In this fledgling industry, Frances finds her true calling: writing stories for this wondrous new medium. She also makes the acquaintance of actress Mary Pickford, whose signature golden curls and lively spirit have earned her the title “America’s Sweetheart.” The two ambitious young women hit it off instantly, their kinship fomented by their mutual fever to create, to move audiences to a frenzy, to start a revolution.

But their ambitions are challenged by both the men around them and the limitations imposed on their gender—and their astronomical success could come at a price. As Mary, the world’s highest paid and most beloved actress, struggles to live her life under the spotlight, she also wonders if it is possible to find love, even with the dashing actor Douglas Fairbanks. Frances, too, longs to share her life with someone. As in any good Hollywood story, dramas will play out, personalities will clash, and even the deepest friendships might be shattered.

With cameos from such notables as Charlie Chaplin, Louis B. Mayer, Rudolph Valentino, and Lillian Gish, The Girls in the Picture is, at its heart, a story of friendship and forgiveness. Melanie Benjamin perfectly captures the dawn of a glittering new era—its myths and icons, its possibilities and potential, and its seduction and heartbreak.

Between the World and Me circulated nearly 850 times and won the National Book Award for Non-Fiction among others.  This collection of essays comes out next week and has 28 holds so far. Comment to claim.

We Were Eight Years in PowerPublisher summary: “We were eight years in power” was the lament of Reconstruction-era black politicians as the American experiment in multiracial democracy ended with the return of white supremacist rule in the South…the story of these present-day eight years is not just about presidential politics. This book also examines the new voices, ideas, and movements for justice that emerged over this period–and the effects of the persistent, haunting shadow of our nation’s old and unreconciled history. Coates powerfully examines the events of the Obama era from his intimate and revealing perspective–the point of view of a young writer who begins the journey in an unemployment office in Harlem and ends it in the Oval Office, interviewing a president.

The Largesse of the Sea Maiden by Denis Johnson (not to be confused with the many other books with that title) is coming out next January.  I am just now ordering it – apologies – but Nancy has an ARC for a lucky person.  Johnson’s novel Tree of Smoke circulated at least 367 times, perhaps even more as it predates CARL migration. Comment to claim. Thanks.

The Largesse of the Sea Maiden by Denis JohnsonPenguin Random House Summary: Twenty-five years after Jesus’ Son, a haunting new collection of short stories on aging, mortality, and transcendence, from National Book Award winner and two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist Denis Johnson.  The Largesse of the Sea Maiden is the long-awaited new story collection from Denis Johnson. It follows the groundbreaking, highly acclaimed Jesus’ Son. Written in the same luminous prose, this collection finds Johnson in new territory, contemplating old age, mortality, the ghosts of the past, and the elusive and unexpected ways the mysteries of the universe assert themselves. Finished shortly before Johnson’s death in May 2017, this collection is the last word from a writer whose work will live on for many years to come.

Courtesy of Nancy with her connections. Comment to claim.

 

Hoffman, Alice. The Rules of Magic. S & S October 10th.

The Rules of MagicSummary: For the Owens family, love is a curse that began in 1620, when Maria Owens was charged with witchery for loving the wrong man.  Hundreds of years later, in New York City at the cusp of the sixties, when the whole world is about to change, Susanna Owens knows that her three children are dangerously unique. Difficult Franny, with skin as pale as milk and blood red hair, shy and beautiful Jet, who can read other people’s thoughts, and charismatic Vincent, who began looking for trouble on the day he could walk.  From the start Susanna sets down rules for her children: No walking in the moonlight, no red shoes, no wearing black, no cats, no crows, no candles, no books about magic. And most importantly, never, ever, fall in love. But when her children visit their Aunt Isabelle, in the small Massachusetts town where the Owens family has been blamed for everything that has ever gone wrong, they uncover family secrets and begin to understand the truth of who they are. Back in New York City each begins a risky journey as they try to escape the family curse.  The Owens children cannot escape love even if they try, just as they cannot escape the pains of the human heart. The two beautiful sisters will grow up to be the revered, and sometimes feared, aunts in Practical Magic, while Vincent, their beloved brother, will leave an unexpected legacy. Thrilling and exquisite, real and fantastical, The Rules of Magic is a story about the power of love reminding us that the only remedy for being human is to be true to yourself.