Though no one seems to be getting official word from the publisher Hachette or any other news, it appears all currently-ordered upcoming print and physical audiobook titles of James Patterson’s new Bookshots series are being cancelled.  This has been confirmed from our vendors Baker & Taylor and Ingram. The print titles are definitely cancelled and the audio and e content may be but it’s less clear.  I will update you on any news.  In the meantime, we are cancelling orders and associated holds in Polaris as we get confirmation of cancelled publication from vendors,  and will rely on the usual cancellation message to customers. Please spread the word.

 

Do NOT expect these in our physical collections any time soon:

Update 3/9/17: We just got word from OverDrive that they believe this series is continuing in electronic formats as they seem to be doing well.

    Juror #3

 

 

Rapid Dutch. Vol. 1 & 2Rapid Mandarin. Vols. 1-2Rapid Greek. Vols. 1-2

Living Language is really migrating to all online courses, so I am phasing out physical discs of them.  I’m pulling unviable old editions from the collection as well, especially if there’s only one copy left.

A lot of Pimsleur programs are still sold by Recorded Books, but because of their price I am being judicious about new orders and replacements.  I would appreciate SINC’s or input  if you notice (or especially if through deletion you are having to create) any gaps in any language learning materials. The response may be a substitution rather than literal replacement.

I’ve also purchased a bit of Pimsleur on OverDrive but there again I’m going slow. It might be worth mentioning to anyone for whom Mango isn’t right or isn’t enough and who really wants something portable.

I also want to point out the newish Berlitz’ Earworms “musical brain trainer” series, which I’m hoping will serve largely as a kind of replacement for the basic “in your car” old series.  They are fun, but I’m  not sure they’re for everyone.  These work by punching out lyrical repetitions of common phrases against jazzy background music, with no detailed grammar explanation. They seem best for business and leisure travelers and hearing learners who don’t care how anything’s spelled. Here’s a positive review from Mezzofanti Guild.

We have bumped up the budget for International materials this year, too, in part because the new Mariner Branch serves a linguistically diverse community.  I am trying to work steadily on those, keeping something in the pipeline at all times. If you regularly work with a community using a collected language and sense stagnation in new items, I would not mind a nudge.

 

Rapid Italian  Rapid French. Vols. 1-3   Rapid German. Vols. 1-2

Watching the rapid fire publication pace of Patterson’s new original paperback series (plural) called Bookshots, I’ve noticed a definite pattern. An example is The Christmas Mystery, a Luc Moncrief Mystery.  Currently, the *book* has only 3 holds on 12 checked out copies.  Meanwhile, fourteen customers are in line for our four audiobook copies of this same title.  In the future, depending on the appeal of the particular series, which seems to vary greatly, I’m aiming for about equal number of print and audio, probably just over or under 10.  It will be interesting to see if these have sustained demand in future years.  The more I think about this the more it makes sense.  Print bookshots are cheap and portable, so can be bought on a whim if desired.  On the other hand, the typical Bookshots audiobook (four little discs in the case of the Christmas Mystery, totalling a nicely digestible 300 minutes) is probably a great fit for daily commuters or weekend trippers to Portland or Vancouver, searching for a bite-sized audiobook they can actually finish in one long trip or a week’s worth of commutes.

On second thought, it also appears some of the titles that came out this  summer (e.g., 113 Minutes) already are languishing a bit several months later and perhaps won’t need many copies in any format.  Is this phenomenon the literary equivalent of a sugar rush?
The Christmas mystery : a Detective Luc Moncrief storyPublisher Summary: In the heart of the holiday season, priceless paintings have vanished from a Park Avenue murder scene. Now, dashing French detective Luc Moncrief must become a quick study in the art of the steal–before a coldblooded killer paints the town red. Merry Christmas, Detective.

 

 

 

 

Patterson, James with James O. Born. Hidden : A Mitchum Story. [January 3, 2017 – 3 holds on 9 print copies – 6 holds on 6 audio]

Hidden : A Mitchum StoryPublisher Summary: Rejected by the Navy SEALs, Mitchum is content to be his small town’s unofficial private eye, until his beloved 14-year-old cousin is abducted. Now he’ll call on every lethal skill to track her down–but nothing is what it seems….

With 43 requests on the eAudio, it’s clear this is something people want to listen to and the regular audiobook is now on order.  There are nearly 300 requests on the book.  This is my vote for surprising “sleeper” of the year.  See publisher information below.  Thank you to Mari in Acquisitions for noticing my original copies selected might be, uh, conservative.

Kondo, Marie.  The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. 

The life-changing magic of tidying up : the Japanese art of decluttering and organizingThis best-selling guide to decluttering your home from Japanese cleaning consultant Marie Kondo takes readers step-by-step through her revolutionary KonMari Method for simplifying, organizing, and storing. Despite constant efforts to declutter your home, do papers still accumulate like snowdrifts and clothes pile up like a tangled mess of noodles? Japanese cleaning consultant Marie Kondo takes tidying to a whole new level, promising that if you properly simplify and organize your home once, you’ll never have to do it again. Most methods advocate a room-by-room or little-by-little approach, which doom you to pick away at your piles of stuff forever. The KonMari Method, with its revolutionary category-by-category system, leads to lasting results. In fact, none of Kondo’s clients have lapsed (and she still has a three-month waiting list). With detailed guidance for determining which items in your house “spark joy” (and which don’t), this international bestseller featuring Tokyo’s newest lifestyle phenomenon will help you clear your clutter and enjoy the unique magic of a tidy home–and the calm, motivated mindset it can inspire.

Audio EbookAudio EbookAudio EbookAudio EbookAudio EbookAudio EbookAudio EbookAudio EbookAudio EbookAudio EbookAudio EbookAudio Ebook

The moment has arrived when there are as many or more copies and holds on the eAudio version of many bestsellers. Some examples are:

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

103 Audiobook holds

121 eAudio holds

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr 

94 Audiobook holds

108 eAudio holds

On the other hand there’s Dead Wake by Erik Larson

55 Audiobook holds

34 eAudio holds

So content clearly still matters when it comes to format choice. I notice, though, that half of my wishlist titles in 3M this week were westerns, something I’ve never seen before.  Books and eBooks have their relative advantages, but I’m hoping the migration to eAudio from Audiobooks continues and accelerates.  These audio formats offer fairly identical listening experiences and the digital format has so many advantages such as no late returns and no repair downtime, etc. while the pricing and use terms are similar (unlike many books).  I know you’re all experts in promoting and inviting in a way that doesn’t feel “pushy” and really appreciate everyone’s contribution to this terrific trend!

 

 

Please take another look at our OverDrive page to see how it displays what are called “curated collections.” These are display areas we can create ourselves, much like the display shelves in 3M.  Jim showed this new feature to us a few months ago, but as a resolution I’m planning on paying a lot more attention to them in 2015. I welcome collection suggestions for eAudio.

 

 

One troubling trend of late has been the number of even bestselling titles, particularly on the non-fiction NYT list, that don’t get produced as a book on CD. In many cases, a look at Amazon’s link for the title will reveal that the only audio edition listed for it is a downloadable file on Amazon’s Audible service, a totally private marketplace for the individual consumer that doesn’t help libraries provide the content to the borrowing public.  This is one of the most common reasons I have to reject talking book RINCs, next to just being out of print.

One likely source of this problem is just the economics of producing audio.  Gregg Olsen, a mystery author we invited to our Reader’s Advisory training in December, 2012, explained that authors get particularly beneficial terms for producing an eAudio on Audible, while consumers often pay much less than they would for physical CD’s.  It’s no wonder that an exclusively downloadable edition is attractive.  

This might continue to be the case, but one new development seems to hold out some hope for us.  Midwest Tape, our key media vendor, has reached an agreement with publishers HarperCollins and Simon & Schuster to take some of their exclusive downloadable titles, on request, and produce physical CD’s for the library market.  For the sake of our audiobook listeners, we can hope this arrangement is successful and more like it are on the horizon.

Thanks Lorraine for pointing this story out to me.