Simon & Schuster has cancelled Dangerous by Milo Yiannopoulous after a controversial video was released this week. The American Conservative Union also cancelled his appearance this week.  PW covers the history of this title which was initially due to be released in March, but recently delayed until June. The New York Times has more information on the most recent controversy.

Updated information:  Items have been deleted from the PAC  and Overdrive. Nancy has notified the requesters of the cancellation of the title when the requester provided an email address.

Collection Development staff had ordered three formats of this title – book, ebook and eaudio.  These were purchased based on requests from our users.  We have removed the catalog entries. Requesters were notified their hold was cancelled with information on the cancellation of the book.  The ebook and eaudio holds have been deleted and requester have been notified by email.

Posted by Becky

 

 

This is an historical biography running at 25 holds. I haven’t gotten to it personally except for some online snippets shared by the publisher but Lorraine finished over the weekend and highly recommends. Queens are a popular and revealing topic for biography (e.g. Catherine the Great by Massie circulated 533 times here and Cleopatra by Schiff over 1300 times!) .  Women rarely got to the throne without being interesting and impactful, it seems.   Comment to claim. If it’s after tomorrow, you may have to wait as I’m out of town for a couple weeks.  I have a feeling in time it will be a solid candidate for a book discussion kit as well.

 

Victoria the queen : an intimate biography of the woman who ruled an empireExcerpt of Publisher Summary: Fifth in line to the throne at the time of her birth, Victoria was an ordinary woman thrust into an extraordinary role. As a girl, she defied her mother’s meddling and an adviser’s bullying, forging an iron will of her own. As a teenage queen, she eagerly grasped the crown and relished the freedom it brought her. At twenty, she fell passionately in love with Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, eventually giving birth to nine children. She loved sex and delighted in power. She was outspoken with her ministers, overstepping conventional boundaries and asserting her opinions. After the death of her adored Albert, she began a controversial, intimate relationship with her servant John Brown. She survived eight assassination attempts over the course of her lifetime. And as science, technology, and democracy were dramatically reshaping the world, Victoria was a symbol of steadfastness and security–queen of a quarter of the world’s population at the height of the British Empire’s reach. Drawing on sources that include fresh revelations about Victoria’s relationship with John Brown, Julia Baird brings vividly to life the fascinating story of a woman who struggled with so many of the things we do today: balancing work and family, raising children, navigating marital strife, losing parents, combating anxiety and self-doubt, finding an identity, searching for meaning.

It’s a Thing – Hygge

January 24, 2017

Hygge (The sites say pronounced hoogah or hue-gah and related to the word hug) is a Danish life philosophy of comfort and happiness that is trending big at the moment. I just noticed MOST of our titles are starting to get out of the Holds Purchase Alert but of course we will be supply the ratio. As yet this seems a milder craze than Kondo tidying up, perhaps appropriate for a more mellow approach to new year self-improvement. The Little Book of Hygge by Meik Wiking has 52 holds, one more than 5 minutes ago as I type.

 

How to hygge : the Nordic secrets to a happy life  The book of hygge : the Danish art of comfort, coziness, and connection  The Little Book of Hygge : Danish Secrets to Happy Living

 

These are first-person accounts, one a memoir about parents recovering from a child’s loss and one a coming-of-age novel (bildungsroman in German/cataloguese) coming out in January and late February.  Setting Free the Kites is getting quite a bit of buzz in chats, etc.  Comment to claim.

Gerson, Stéphane. Disaster Falls : A Family Story. Crown, January.

Disaster Falls: A Family Story

A haunting chronicle of what endures when the world we know is swept away. On a day like any other, on a rafting trip down Utah’s Green River, Stéphane Gerson’s eight-year-old son, Owen, drowned in a spot known as Disaster Falls. That same night, as darkness fell, Stéphane huddled in a tent with his wife, Alison, and their older son, Julian, trying to understand what seemed inconceivable. “It’s just the three of us now,” Alison said over the sounds of a light rain and, nearby, the rushing river. “We cannot do it alone. We have to stick together.” Disaster Falls chronicles the aftermath of that day and their shared determination to stay true to Alison’s resolution. At the heart of the book is Stéphane’s portrait of a marriage critically tested. Husband and wife grieve in radically different ways that threaten to isolate each of them in their post-Owen worlds. (He feels so far,” Stéphane says, when Alison shows him a selfie Owen had taken. “He feels so close,” she says.) With beautiful specificity, Stéphane shows how they resist that isolation and reconfigure their marriage from within.  As Stephane navigates his grief, the memoir expands to explore how society reacts to the death of a child. He depicts the “good death” of his father, which enlarges Stéphane’s perspective on mortality. He excavates the history of the Green River–rife with hazards not mentioned in the rafting company’s brochures. He explores how stories can both memorialize and obscure a person’s life–and how they can rescue us.  Disaster Falls is a powerful account of a life cleaved in two–raw, truthful, and unexpectedly consoling.

George, Alex.  Setting Free the Kites. G. P. Putnam, February 21.

Setting Free the Kites“For Robert Carter, life in his coastal Maine hometown is comfortably predictable. But in 1976, on his first day of eighth grade, he meets Nathan Tilly, who changes everything. Nathan is confident, fearless, impetuous-and fascinated by kites and flying. Robert and Nathan’s budding friendship is forged in the crucible of two family tragedies, and as the boys struggle to come to terms with loss, they take summer jobs at the local rundown amusement park. It’s there that Nathan’s boundless capacity for optimism threatens to overwhelm them both, and where they learn some harsh truths about family, desire, and revenge. Unforgettable and heart-breaking, Setting Free the Kites is a poignant and moving exploration of the pain, joy, and glories of young friendship.”

Unfortunately I don’t have an ARC – and see none yet on Edelweiss – but I’m going ahead with 15 copies. This comes out in June.  It will be in the catalog within a week or so.

 

You Don't Have to Say You Love Me

Publisher summary: A searing, deeply moving memoir about family, love, and loss from the critically acclaimed, bestselling National Book Award winner.

When his mother passed away at the age of 78, Sherman Alexie responded the only way he knew how: he wrote. The result is this stunning memoir. Featuring 78 poems, 78 essays and intimate family photographs, Alexie shares raw, angry, funny, profane, tender memories of a childhood few can imagine–growing up dirt-poor on an Indian reservation, one of four children raised by alcoholic parents. Throughout, a portrait emerges of his mother as a beautiful, mercurial, abusive, intelligent, complicated woman. YOU DON’T HAVE TO SAY YOU LOVE ME is a powerful account of a complicated relationship, an unflinching and unforgettable remembrance.

LibraryReads announced its January selections, starting the new year with an almost exclusive but far-reaching focus on fiction.  Earlyword has an article with some extra buzz and context.

We have all in print and all but two that are available in physical audio.  Those two, the Her Every Fear, and the Second Mrs. Hockaday, will be in the catalog shortly. Watch for Bibliofiles for more detailed coverage.

The Favorite

Delaney, JP. The Girl Before. Ballantine. 

The girl before : a novelIn the tradition of The Girl on the Train, The Silent Wife, and Gone Girl comes an enthralling psychological thriller that spins one woman’s seemingly good fortune, and another woman’s mysterious fate, through a kaleidoscope of duplicity, death, and deception. Please make a list of every possession you consider essential to your life. The request seems odd, even intrusive–and for the two women who answer, the consequences are devastating. EMMA Reeling from a traumatic break-in, Emma wants a new place to live. But none of the apartments she sees are affordable or feel safe. Until One Folgate Street. The house is an architectural masterpiece: a minimalist design of pale stone, plate glass, and soaring ceilings. But there are rules. The enigmatic architect who designed the house retains full control: no books, no throw pillows, no photos or clutter or personal effects of any kind. The space is intended to transform its occupant–and it does. JANE After a personal tragedy, Jane needs a fresh start. When she finds One Folgate Street she is instantly drawn to the space–and to its aloof but seductive creator. Moving in, Jane soon learns about the untimely death of the home’s previous tenant, a woman similar to Jane in age and appearance. As Jane tries to untangle truth from lies, she unwittingly follows the same patterns, makes the same choices, crosses paths with the same people, and experiences the same terror, as the girl before. Advance praise for The Girl Before “Dazzling, startling, and above all cunning–a pitch-perfect novel of psychological suspense.”–Lee Child “Riveting! One of the most compelling page-turners I’ve read in years. Twisty, turny, and with an ending not to be missed!”–Lisa Gardner”– Provided by publisher.

 

Harper, Jane. The Dry. Flatiron. [15 holds]

The dry : a novel

One of the most stunning debuts I’ve ever read . . . Every word is near perfect.’ — David Baldacci. A small town hides big secrets in The Dry, an atmospheric, page-turning debut mystery by award-winning author JaneHarper. After getting a note demanding his presence, Federal Agent Aaron Falk arrives in his hometown for the first time in decades to attend the funeral of his best friend, Luke. Twenty years ago when Falk was accused of murder, Luke was his alibi. Falk and his father fled under a cloudof suspicion, saved from prosecution only because of Luke’s steadfast claim that the boys had been together at the time of the crime. But now more than one person knows they didn’t tell the truth back then, and Luke is dead. Amid the worst drought in a century, Falk and the local detective question what really happened to Luke. As Falk reluctantly investigates to see if there’s more to Luke’s death than there seems to be, long-buried mysteries resurface, as do the lies that have haunted them. And Falk will find that small towns have always hidden big secrets. “– Provided by publisher.

The New York Times Wednesday published its annual 100 notable books article for 2016. As usual, it’s a treasure trove of overlooked gems as well as more obvious award listers and bestsellers, worth sifting more than once. It also presents the kind of titles that would benefit most from heartfelt promotion.

A few personal favorites with no holds queue at this typing:

Faludi, Susan. In the Darkroom. Metropolitan Books. 

In the darkroomIn the summer of 2004 I set out to investigate someone I scarcely knew, my father. The project began with a grievance, the grievance of a daughter whose parent had absconded from her life. I was in pursuit of a scofflaw, an artful dodger who had skipped out on so many things–obligation, affection, culpability, contrition. I was preparing an indictment, amassing discovery for a trial. But somewhere along the line, the prosecutor became a witness.” So begins Susan Faludi‘s extraordinary inquiry into the meaning of identity in the modern world and in her own haunted family saga. When the feminist writer learned that her 76-year-old father–long estranged and living in Hungary–had undergone sex reassignment surgery, that investigation would turn personal and urgent. How was this new parent who claimed to be “a complete woman now” connected to the silent, explosive, and ultimately violent father she had known? Faludichases that mystery into the recesses of her suburban childhood and her father’s many previous incarnations: American dad, Alpine mountaineer, swashbuckling adventurer in the Amazon outback, Jewish fugitive in Holocaust Budapest. When the author travels to Hungary to reunite with her father, she drops into a labyrinth of dark histories and dangerous politics in a country hell-bent on repressing its past and constructing a fanciful–and virulent–nationhood. The search for identity that has transfixed our century was proving as treacherous for nations as for individuals. Faludi‘s struggle to come to grips with her father’s reinvented self takes her across borders–historical, political, religious, sexual–to bring her face to face with the question of the age: Is identity something you “choose,” or is it the very thing you can’t escape?”– Provided by publisher.

 

Kirsch, Adam. The People and the Books: 18 Classics of Jewish Literature. W. W. Norton. 

The people and the books : 18 classics of Jewish literatureAn essential exploration of a rich literary tradition from the Bible to modern times, by a “rare literary authority” (New York Times Book Review). Jews have long embraced their identity as “the people of the book.” But outside of the Bible, much of the Jewish literary tradition remains little known. ThePeople and the Books shows how central questions and themes of our history and culture are reflected in the Jewish literary canon: the nature of God, the right way to understand the Bible, the relationship of the Jews to their Promised Land, and the challenges of living as a minority in Diaspora. Adam Kirsch explores eighteen classic texts including the biblical books of Deuteronomy and Esther, the philosophy of Maimonides, the autobiography of the medieval businesswoman Gluckel of Hameln, and the Zionist manifestos of Theodor Herzl. From the Jews of ancient Rome to the mystical devotees of Hasidism in Eastern Europe, The People and the Books brings the treasures of Jewish literature to life and offers new ways to think about their enduring power and influence”– Provided by publisher.

 

 

Palacio, Derek. The Mortifications. Tim Duggan.

The mortifications : a novelIn 1980, a rural Cuban family is torn apart during the Mariel Boatlift. Uxbal Encarnacion – father, husband, political insurgent–refuses to leave behind the revolutionary ideals and lush tomato farms of his sun-soaked homeland. His wife Soledad takes young Isabel and Ulises hostage and flees with them to America, leaving behind Uxbal for the promise of a better life. But instead of settling with fellow Cuban immigrants in Miami’s familiar heat, Soledad pushes further north into the stark, wintry landscape of Hartford, Connecticut. There, in the long shadow of their estranged patriarch, now just a distant memory, the exiled mother and her children begin a process of growth and transformation.<br> <br> Each struggles and flourishes in their own way: Isabel, spiritually hungry and desperate for higher purpose, finds herself tethered to death and the dying in uncanny ways. Ulises is bookish and awkwardly tall, like his father, whose memory haunts and shapes the boy’s thoughts and desires. Presiding over them both is Soledad. Once consumed by her love for her husband, she begins a tempestuous new relationship with a Dutch tobacco farmer. But just as the Encarnaci#65533;ns begin to cultivate their strange new way of life, Cuba calls them back. Uxbal is alive, and waiting.

 

Bakewell, Sarah. At the Existentialist Café: Freedom, Being, and Apricot Cocktails. Other Press. 

At the existentialist café : freedom, being, and apricot cocktails with Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, Martin Heidegger, Karl Jaspers, Edmund Husserl, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and othersParis, 1933: three contemporaries meet over apricot cocktails at the Bec-de-Gaz bar on the rue Montparnasse. They are the young Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and longtime friend Raymond Aron, a fellow philosopher who raves to them about a new conceptual framework from Berlin called Phenomenology. “You see,” he says, “if you are a phenomenologist you can talk about this cocktail and make philosophy out of it!” It was this simple phrase that would ignite a movement, inspiring Sartre to integrate Phenomenology into his own French, humanistic sensibility, thereby creating an entirely new philosophical approach inspired by themes of radical freedom, authentic being, and political activism. This movement would sweep through the jazz clubs and cafés of the Left Bank before making its way across the world as Existentialism. Featuring not only philosophers, but also playwrights, anthropologists, convicts, and revolutionaries, At the Existentialist Café follows the existentialists’ story, from the first rebellious spark through the Second World War, to its role in postwar liberation movements such as anticolonialism, feminism, and gay rights. Interweaving biography and philosophy, it is the epic account of passionate encounters–fights, love affairs, mentorships, rebellions, and long partnerships–and a vital investigation into what the existentialists have to offer us today, at a moment when we are once again confronting the major questions of freedom, global responsibility, and human authenticity in a fractious and technology-driven world.