ARCs Arthurs Stories and Ali on Ali – Also Jobs Memoir (no ARC)

June 12, 2018

Comment to claim.  The Ali book is an interesting and highly visual presentation, in many places resembling magazine article formatting. I’m only now ordering this but wondered if someone out there would be in to sports related ARCs.  While on the subject of daughters writing about fathers, I wanted to mention the upcoming title Small Fry: A Memoir by Lisa Brennan-Jobs.  The word at Day of Dialog was that this portrays a highly unconventional and sometimes severe upbringing by a late tech icon, but expressing admiration all the same.  I’m starting with 15 copies which will be in the catalog soon. Sorry no ARC of that.

Arthurs, Alexia. How to Love a Jamaican. July 24th.

How to Love A Jamaican

“In these kaleidoscopic stories of Jamaica and its diaspora we hear many voices at once: some cultivated, some simple, some wickedly funny, some deeply melancholic. All of them shine.”–Zadie Smith

Named one of Entertainment Weekly ‘s “Hot Summer Reads of 2018” and BuzzFeed ‘s “Summer Books to Get Excited About”

Tenderness and cruelty, loyalty and betrayal, ambition and regret–Alexia Arthurs navigates these tensions to extraordinary effect in her debut collection about Jamaican immigrants and their families back home. Sweeping from close-knit island communities to the streets of New York City and midwestern university towns, these eleven stories form a portrait of a nation, a people, and a way of life. In “Light-Skinned Girls and Kelly Rowlands,” an NYU student befriends a fellow Jamaican whose privileged West Coast upbringing has blinded her to the hard realities of race. In “Mash Up Love,” a twin’s chance sighting of his estranged brother–the prodigal son of the family–stirs up unresolved feelings of resentment. In “Bad Behavior,” a couple leave their wild teenage daughter with her grandmother in Jamaica, hoping the old ways will straighten her out. In “Mermaid River,” a Jamaican teenage boy is reunited with his mother in New York after eight years apart. In “The Ghost of Jia Yi,” a recently murdered student haunts a despairing Jamaican athlete recruited to an Iowa college. And in “Shirley from a Small Place,” a world-famous pop star retreats to her mother’s big new house in Jamaica, which still holds the power to restore something vital.

 

Brennan-Jobs, Lisa. Small Fry: A Memoir. Grove Atlantic, Sept. 4th.

Born on a farm and named in a field by her parents—artist Chrisann Brennan and Steve Jobs—Lisa Brennan-Jobs’s childhood unfolded in a rapidly changing Silicon Valley. When she was young, Lisa’s father was a mythical figure who was rarely present in her life. As she grew older, her father took an interest in her, ushering her into a new world of mansions, vacations, and private schools. His attention was thrilling, but he could also be cold, critical and unpredictable. When her relationship with her mother grew strained in high school, Lisa decided to move in with her father, hoping he’d become the parent she’d always wanted him to be.

Small Fry is Lisa Brennan-Jobs’s poignant story of a childhood spent between two imperfect but extraordinary homes. Scrappy, wise, and funny, young Lisa is an unforgettable guide through her parents’ fascinating and disparate worlds. Part portrait of a complex family, part love letter to California in the seventies and eighties, Small Fry is an enthralling book by an insightful new literary voice.

 

Ali, Hana.  Ali on Ali. Workman, 2018.

Ali on Ali

The Greatest—in his own unforgettable words. This collection of quotes is accompanied by family photographs and the stories behind the sayings by Ali’s daughter and biographer, Hana Ali. A book of inspiration, humor, and Ali’s inimitable way with words, it’s a unique look at a unique and beloved person.
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2 Responses to “ARCs Arthurs Stories and Ali on Ali – Also Jobs Memoir (no ARC)”

  1. Jenny Says:

    I would like Ali On Ali if still available. Thanks!

  2. Darren Says:

    Sure thing – sending now


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