3 ARC’s – McCall Smith – Jo Nesbø – Jane Austen Analysis – note on PDA

May 15, 2017

These are ARC’s I picked up at a Random House title presentation over the weekend. The Isabel Dalhousie novel is slated for July; the other two are out this month.  I’m hoping the Scandinavian thriller readers out there among you will get a chance to claim the Nesbø (beat the queue or savor for later).

Jane Austen the Secret Radical is a non-fiction title and a Patron Driven Acquisition (PDA) title so I thought I’d mention what’s up with PDA. The adult biography pilot is closed and no new title records are being added to the catalog. I will, however, continue to order from these records until the last ones have either been ordered or removed for lack of holds.  We have learned a lot from this interesting experiment, but for now are not recommending that PDA be adopted as a permanent selection method.  I will be making a brief presentation on this at this month’s Managers Meeting as well. There are many logistical challenges, including modulating the title source list/stream, and the initial cost and circulation metrics have not been what we hoped, though I hope looking again at figures in the fall will show improvement for PDA vs non-PDA titles over a longer timeframe.

Comment to claim. 

McCall Smith, Alexander. A Distant View of Everything. Pantheon, July.

A Distant View of EverythingPublisher summary: When a matchmaker begins to question her latest match, Isabel Dalhousie is called upon to help.

A new baby brings an abundance of joy to Isabel and her husband, Jamie—but almost-four-year-old Charlie is none too keen on his newborn brother. In fact, he refuses to acknowledge Magnus, and Isabel must find a way to impress upon her older son the patience and understanding that have served as guiding principles in her own life.

These are the very qualities that bring Bea Shandon, an old acquaintance of Isabel’s, to seek her help in a tricky situation. Something on a matchmaker, Bea has introduced a wealthy female friend to a cosmetic surgeon at her most recent dinner party. Then new information comes to light about the surgeon that causes Bea to doubt his motives and the auspiciousness of the match. Isabel agrees to find out more, but as her enquiries take an unexpected turn, she starts to wonder whom exactly she should be investigating. As ever, Isabel’s intelligence, quick wit and deep empathy will come to her aid as she grapples with the issues that are her bread and butter: friendship and its duties, the obligation of truthfulness, and the importance of perspective.

The Thirst

Nesbø, Jo. The Thirst. Knopf, May.

Publisher Summary: The murder victim, a self-declared Tinder addict. The one solid clue–fragments of rust and paint in her wounds–leaves the investigating team baffled.
Two days later, there’s a second murder: a woman of the same age, a Tinder user, an eerily similar scene.
The chief of police knows there’s only one man for this case. But Harry Hole is no longer with the force. He promised the woman he loves, and he promised himself, that he’d never go back: not after his last case, which put the people closest to him in grave danger.
But there’s something about these murders that catches his attention, something in the details that the investigators have missed. For Harry, it’s like hearing “the voice of a man he was trying not to remember.” Now, despite his promises, despite everything he risks, Harry throws himself back into the hunt for a figure who haunts him, the monster who got away.

 

Kelly, Helena. Jane Austen, the Secret Radical. Knopf, May.

Jane Austen, The Secret RadicalPublisher Summary: In this fascinating, revelatory work, Helena Kelly–dazzling Jane Austen authority–looks past the grand houses, the pretty young women, past the demure drawing room dramas and witty commentary on the narrow social worlds of her time that became the hallmark of Austen’s work to bring to light the serious, ambitious, deeply subversive nature of this beloved writer. Kelly illuminates the radical subjects–slavery, poverty, feminism, the Church, evolution, among them–considered treasonous at the time, that Austen deftly explored in the six novels that have come to embody an age. The author reveals just how in the novels we find the real Jane Austen: a clever, clear-sighted woman “of information,” fully aware of what was going on in the world and sure about what she thought of it. We see a writer who understood that the novel–until then seen as mindless “trash”–could be a great art form and who, perhaps more than any other writer up to that time, imbued it with its particular greatness.

 

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6 Responses to “3 ARC’s – McCall Smith – Jo Nesbø – Jane Austen Analysis – note on PDA”

  1. Ashley Green Says:

    I would love a copy of the Austen one.

  2. Darren Says:

    Yours – on its way – thanks!

  3. Michelle C. Says:

    I’ll take the Nesbo if it’s still available!

  4. Darren Says:

    Yes! Coming your way.

  5. Kristin P. Says:

    I’d love the McCall Smith. Thanks!

  6. Darren Says:

    Sure thing – on its way


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