Bob Dylan Literature Nobel Laureate!

October 13, 2016

The Academy has announced its 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature goes to none other than Bob Dylan.

“for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition”.

Several news and media sources are covering this announcement and Dylan’s output and career, among them Publisher’s Weekly, The New York Times, and NPR.

We probably don’t own all of his opus but I’ll highlight a few books we do own and some particularly relevant music (thanks Jim!), though we own much more. Don’t forget Hoopla! as a vehicle for connecting to his work.

Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits – Volumes 1 and 2.  [Contain early significant tracks]

Bob Dylan's greatest hitsBob Dylan's greatest hits. Volume II

 

Chronicles. Volume One. Simon & Schuster, 2004. [Confirmed volume 2 never yet completed]

Chronicles. Volume one

The first volume in a series of memoirs by a musical and political icon. Circa 1965, arguably the high point in his creative genius, Bob Dylan writes about the beginning of his music career, his early loves, and offers a very personal, anecdotal view of this time of creativity, innovation and music history.

 

 

 

 

Tarantula.  Scribner, 2004. 

Tarantula

Music legend Bob Dylan’s only work of fiction–a combination of stream of consciousness prose, lyrics, and poetry that gives fans insight into one of the most influential singer-songwriters of our time. Written in 1966, Tarantula is a collection of poems and prose that evokes the turbulence of the times in which it was written, and gives a unique insight into Dylan’s creative evolution. It captures Bob Dylan’s preoccupations at a crucial juncture in his artistic development, showcasing the imagination of a folk poet laureate who was able to combine the humanity and compassion of his country roots with the playful surrealism of modern art. Angry, funny, and strange, the poems and prose in this collection reflect the concerns found in Dylan’s most seminal music: a sense of protest, a verbal playfulness and spontaneity, and a belief in the artistic legitimacy of chronicling everyday life and eccentricity on the street.

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