With seven holds on four copies, this is due on April 3rd.  Something in a similar vein is Witchy Winter, both from Baen. Comment to claim.

Though Hell Should Bar the Way

“Roy Olfetrie planned to be an officer in the Republic of Cinnabar but when his father was unmasked as a white-collar criminal he had to take whatever was offered. What is offered is a chance to accompany Captain Daniel Leary and Lady Adele Mundy as theygo off to start a war that will put Roy at the sharp end. Duty snatches Roy from the harem of a pirate chief to a world of monsters, from interstellar reaches in a half-wrecked starship to assassination attempts at posh houses. The action doesn’t slow andnor can Roy. Captain Leary himself has given Roy a chance and he is determined to make the most of it”– Provided by publisher.

 Witchy WinterSEQUEL TO WITCHY EYE. Next in series, which debuted with the stunningly reviewed Witchy Eye. Butler delivers another brilliant Americana flintlock fantasy novel.


Sarah Calhoun paid a hard price for her entry onto the stage of the Empire’s politics, but she survived. Now she rides north into the Ohio and her father’s kingdom, Cahokia. To win the Serpent Throne, she’ll have to defeat seven other candidates, win over the kingdom’s regent, and learn the will of a hidden goddess—while mastering her people’s inscrutable ways and watching her own back.

In New Orleans, a new and unorthodox priest arises to plague the chevalier and embody the curse of the murdered Bishop Ukwu. He battles the chevalier’s ordinary forces as well as a troop of Old World mamelukes for control of the city and the mouth of the great Mississippi River. Dodging between these rival titans, a crew of Catalan pirates—whose captain was once a close associate of Mad Hannah Penn—grapples with the chevalier over the fate of one of their mates.

Meanwhile, a failed ceremony and a sick infant send the Anishinaabe hunter Ma’iingan on a journey across the Empire to Cavalier Johnsland, to a troubled foster child named Nathaniel. Ma’iingan is promised that Nathaniel is a mighty healer and can save his imperiled baby, but first Nathaniel—a pale young man with a twisted ear who hears the voices of unseen beings—must himself be rescued, from oppression, imprisonment, and madness.



I think this time I’ll get a taker.  The NY Times recently featured an article on Alan Hollinghurst and his writing. I still have an ARC.  Comment to claim. There are now 15 holds on 7 copies.

Hollinghurst, Alan. The Sparsholt Affair. Knopf, March 13th.

The Sparsholt Affair“From the internationally acclaimed winner of the Man Booker Prize, a masterly new novel that spans seven transformative decades in England–from the 1940s to the present–as it plumbs the richly complex relationships of a remarkable family. In 1940, David Sparsholt arrives at Oxford to study engineering, though his sights are set on joining the Royal Air Force. Handsome, athletic, charismatic, he is unaware of his effect on others–especially on Evert Dax, the lonely son of a celebrated novelist who isdestined to become a writer himself. With the world at war, and the Blitz raging in London, Oxford nevertheless exists at a strange remove: a place of fleeting beauty–and secret liaisons. A friendship develops between these two young men that will have unexpected consequences as the novel unfolds. Alan Hollinghurst’s new novel explores the legacy of David Sparsholt across three generations, on friends and family alike; we experience through its characters changes in taste, morality, and private life ina sequence of vividly rendered episodes: a Sparsholt holiday in Cornwall; eccentric social gatherings at the Dax family home; the adventures of David’s son Johnny, a painter in 1970s London; the push and pull in a group of friends brought together by art,literature, and love. And evoking the increasing openness of gay life, The Sparsholt Affair becomes a meditation on human transience, even as it poignantly expresses the longing for permanence and continuity.”– Provided by publisher.

PW Daily highlights a new trend of the old in cookbooks. British-born and living now in Skagit County, Graham Kerr hosted a show called the Galloping Gourmet 1969-1971 and is now coming out with a cookbook much of the content of which originally appeared in the mid-60’s.  In the past ten years, Kerr has made several local appearances.  This is in the catalog and is up for holds.  The Vintage Baker book by Jessie Sheehan also comes out in May but already has 6 holds on 7 first-order copies. The third title highlighted in the PW article – Something Old Something New by Tamar Adler is coming April 3rd and has 15 copies in the catalog.  Sorry no ARC’s, and in fact I’ve never seen a cookbook ARC. Ah, the utter innocence of carbs!

Kerr, Graham. The Graham Kerr Cookbook: The Galloping Gourmet. Random House May 15th.

The Graham Kerr CookbookA new edition of a beloved cookbook celebrating the classic dishes and witty humor that were signature to TV chef Graham Kerr’s The Galloping Gourmet .

With his hallmark joyous abandon, British-born chef Graham Kerr was a pioneer of food television, hosting the popular series The Galloping Gourmet from 1969 to 1971. Kerr presented approachable, step-by-step instructions for recipes packed with personality and flavor. A bible for generations of fans, this classic cookbook is now reissued, with new commentary from Kerr and an introduction by the Lee brothers.

Kerr’s knowing and fun-loving approach to home cooking was ahead of its time, and has more in common with Mario Batali’s or Jamie Oliver’s outlook than with his 1960s contemporaries. Like Batali, Kerr was a passionate cook who was also not afraid to have fun in the kitchen. The encyclopedic variety of recipes–ranging from the basics of brewing coffee and deep excursions into egg cookery, to more sophisticated preparations of fish and poultry–combined with Kerr’s devotion to technique, ingredients, and presentation open up a world of lost classics for today’s home cook. Featuring step-by-step illustrations alongside new commentary updating the recipes for contemporary tastes, this edition gives today’s home chefs the best of cooking from the exuberant postwar era.

Sheehan, Jessie. The Vintage Baker. Chronicle Books, May 15th.

The Vintage Baker

This keepsake cookbook features fetching retro patterns and illustrations, luscious photography, an embossed foil cover, and–surprise! –a tiny, vintage-style, booklet inside. Blue-ribbon recipes inspired by baking pamphlets from the 1920s to the 1960s are rendered with irresistible charm for modern tastes in this sweet package. Here are more than 50 cookies, pies, cakes, bars, and more, plus informative headnotes detailing the origins of each recipe and how they were tweaked into deliciousness. For home bakers, collectors of vintage cookbooks or kitchenware–really, anyone who loves beautiful, quirky gifts–this is a gem.



Comment to claim –

Love and Ruin

The bestselling author of The Paris Wife returns to the subject of Ernest Hemingway in a novel about his passionate, stormy marriage to Martha Gellhorn–a fiercely independent, ambitious young woman who would become one of the greatest war correspondents of the twentieth century

In 1937, twenty-eight-year-old Martha Gellhorn travels alone to Madrid to report on the atrocities of the Spanish Civil War and becomes drawn to the stories of ordinary people caught in the devastating conflict. It’s the adventure she’s been looking for and her chance to prove herself a worthy journalist in a field dominated by men. But she also finds herself unexpectedly–and uncontrollably–falling in love with Hemingway, a man on his way to becoming a legend.

In the shadow of the impending Second World War, and set against the turbulent backdrops of Madrid and Cuba, Martha and Ernest’s relationship and their professional careers ignite. But when Ernest publishes the biggest literary success of his career, For Whom the Bell Tolls, they are no longer equals, and Martha must make a choice: surrender to the confining demands of being a famous man’s wife or risk losing Ernest by forging a path as her own woman and writer. It is a dilemma that could force her to break his heart, and hers.

Heralded by Ann Patchett as “the new star of historical fiction,” Paula McLain brings Gellhorn’s story richly to life and captures her as a heroine for the ages: a woman who will risk absolutely everything to find her own voice.

Shelf Awareness announced this morning that Sherman Alexie will not accept the Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction, which was to be awarded in a ceremony at the ALA conference in New Orleans in June.  Recent allegations of sexual harassment by ten women have tarnished Alexie’s reputation and created a dilemma for ALA; the organization “believes that every person has the right to a safe environment free from sexual harassment.”

For more detail, follow this link:


The Pew Research Center issued a report today stating that almost 1 in 5 Americans have taken up the audiobook habit.  The study goes on to say that we are spreading our wings in terms of formats but print books remain the most popular format.  Reassuringly for us, the percent of Americans who have read a book – in any format – in the past 12 months remains at 74%, holding steady since the last report in 2012.

Follow the link to read more about this study:  Pew Research Center study on reading habits.


An article in Good E Reader asks Will People Buy Audiobooks and Ebooks from Walmart?

From the article:

“E-Book sales have been flat for past few years and print is still king. [6]87.2 million print books were sold last year, up from 674.1 million in 2016. The increase follows a 3.3% increase in 2016. Units have risen every year since 2013, and 2017 sales were up 10.8% from that year.

The digital audiobook and ebook industry desperately needs new sales channels to fuel growth. Amazon has dominated the US market for over a decade. Will Walmart be the golden goose that publishers have been waiting for?”

Last month, PW reported print sales were up to 687 million (confirming the missing 6 in the Good E Reader article), with increases in both hardcover and trade and retail outlets selling ever more and mass merchants less.

While this is what’s going on in private sales, our OverDrive usage continues to reach new highs. The dashboard for January shows circulation reaching almost 150k, and, even more exciting, an upswing in unique users to 23,662, over 20% higher than this time last year.  There seems to be a bump every January, probably reflecting new users taking advantage of holiday gift devices (?)  If deals like this Kobo Wal-Mart push and similar introduce more people in more areas to ebooks, will demand for ebooks rise from any source and overall format preferences change, or is there an inverse relationship and library use is rising in part because of customer resistance to direct purchases?  In these still early days there definitely seems to be a disconnect.